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ATA’s “Explora Caza Con Arco” Aims to Boost Bowhunting Among Spanish-Speaking Populations

Earlier this year, the Archery Trade Association launched “Explora Caza Con Arco,” a Spanish version of the ATA’s popular “Explore Bowhunting” program.
Photo Credit: ATA/Explora Caza Con Arco

Author: Katelyn Rutland

Thirty-eight million. That’s how many people age 5 and older speak Spanish at home, according to a 2011 survey by the U.S. Census Bureau. To meet this growing population’s needs, the Archery Trade Association earlier this year launched “Explora Caza Con Arco,” a Spanish version of the ATA’s popular “Explore Bowhunting” program.

Explore Bowhunting launched in 2010 as an educational program that helps educators, instructors and program leaders teach youths basic bowhunting skills. Twenty-two states have adopted the program since its release. By adding Explora Caza Con Arco, the ATA hopes to reach a new growing market.

Emily Beach, ATA’s senior director of outreach and education, said Hispanics are the fastest-growing minority. They represent $1.4 billion in spending power, according to the Census Bureau. “Our industry can tap into this growing market by providing tools to help them become bowhunters,” she said. “This includes translated how-to resources like those provided in Explore Bowhunting.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Multistate Conservation Grant Program awarded the ATA $52,500 to translate, design and print curriculum guides and student handbooks. The ATA finished the project in one year with help from The Language Doctors Inc. and independent translator Andrea Vásquez.

The ATA’s Explora Caza Con Arco includes translated how-to resources like those provided in Explore Bowhunting. These resources give Spanish-speaking communities the tools to use public lands and start bowhunting. Photo Credit: ATA/Explora Caza Con Arco

“Explora Caza Con Arco gives Spanish-speaking communities the tools to use public lands and start bowhunting,” Beach said. “This will lead to higher participation in hunting, fishing, boating and other outdoor recreation. In turn, growth in these activities helps sustain our hunting heritage and ensure outdoor recreation’s future.”

Beach also noted the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation discovered through its Vamos a Pescar initiative that Hispanic visitors especially like how-to pages. “By emphasizing problem-solving and decision-making skills, Explore Bowhunting, or Explora Caza Con Arco, is the ideal resource for introducing bowhunting to this untapped and highly sought-after market,” Beach said.

Jay McAninch, ATA’s president/CEO, agrees. “Explora Caza Con Arco is just one more example of how Emily Beach and her team have continued to develop first-class programs to meet the needs of those interested in bowhunting,” he said. “A program like this is overdue and will help state wildlife agencies and local communities tap into a market that’s received little attention over the years. For our industry, Explora Caza Con Arco opens hunting opportunities to Hispanic communities, and boosts bowhunting and archery participation nationwide, which strengthens participation.”

The ATA offers the program for free to state wildlife agencies, federal-government agencies, and nongovernmental organizations.

To learn more about Explora Caza Con Arco and how to implement it in your state, contact Beach at emilybeach@archerytrade.org.

About Explora Caza Con Arco

Explora Caza Con Arco was funded by the Multistate Conservation Grant Program (Grant Award F16AP00108), a program supported with funds from the Wildlife Restoration Program and jointly managed by the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

About Explore Bowhunting

Explore Bowhunting launched in 2010 as an educational program that helps educators, instructors and program leaders teach youths basic bowhunting skills. Twenty-two states have adopted the program since its release.

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