Business

5 Ways to Boost Your Bowhunting Business This Season

From marketing tips to bowhunting classes, here are 5 ways to succeed.
Photo Credit: Tommy Martino via Missoulian

Author: Cassie Scott

You can boost your business this season by focusing on bowhunting to attract new customers and engage current customers during the months ahead. Try one – or all five – of the strategies below to increase your profits.

1. Hold Bowhunting Classes


Atract beginner bowhunters by hosting classes that answer common questions about gear, wildlife and hunting tactics. Then, point them to logical next steps, like purchasing equipment.  Photo Credit: Lancaster Archery Supply. 

Hold a class packed with specific information about bowhunting tactics, treestand safety, camouflage tips and white-tailed deer. You’ll likely attract beginning bowhunters and people who want to try something new.

Offering archery programs and classes is easy! The Archery Trade Association offers its Explore Bowhunting and Explore Bowfishing programs to all ATA members for free. Explore Bowhunting is a valuable educational program that helps instructors, educators and program leaders teach students basic bowhunting skills. The curriculum includes 23 lessons and hands-on activities that help students understand nature, and deepen their appreciation for the woods and wildlife.

Click here to download the Intro to Explore Bowhunting document – a one-hour sample class outline – to get started. For more information about Explore Bowhunting and Explore Bowfishing, contact Josh Gold.

2. Market Bowhunting Services, and Your Business


Specials on bow tune-ups, string/cable upgrades and refletching services keep your customers’ gear ready for action throughout the season. Photo Credit: Shane Indrebo.

Bowhunting can be rough on equipment and accessories. Customers might drop their bow, break their bowstring or shoot the fletching off their arrows. Therefore, advertise and promote special deals on service alongside your products. Offer specials on bow tune-ups, string/cable upgrades and refletching services, all of which keep your customers’ gear ready for action throughout the season.

Where should you market your sales and services? Consider online options like your website and social media, but also consider media outlets like TV, radio and newspapers. Post in-store signs, and hang fliers on public bulletin boards and the windows of nearby businesses. Do all you can to advertise on many platforms and in different places. Target as many customers as possible, but adhere to minimum advertised price policies.

3. Host Bowhunting Events


Events like virtual hunting competitions help hunters hone their shooting skills through realistic hunting scenarios. Photo Credit: Shane Indrebo.

Create a shooting league dedicated to bowhunters who wish to keep sharp for the season ahead and boost their potential to make lethal shots. Hold the league after legal shooting hours to ensure good participation. Or conduct it as a “virtual league,” which lets participants shoot weekly whenever they’re free. Many bowhunters do not like being locked into a specific night during bow season. Meanwhile, competition motivates archers to “earn” better scores by spending more time at your range, which helps your cash flow.

Another good idea is to host a bowhunter-education class. These classes are similar to hunter-education courses. Check with your state wildlife agency to learn how to find an instructor or get certified as an instructor to host these events. These classes teach students game identification; important laws and regulations; and safe, responsible ways to handle equipment. Hand out 10-percent-off coupons during these events to attract new customers.

No matter which options you choose,  hosting archery-related events helps your business reach new archery customers.

4. Run A Contest


Simple competitions like photo contests encourage hunters to visit your shop to enter or track the contest’s progress. Plus, when customers share photos of their bow and tag your shop on social media, you gain free marketing and increase your reach. Photo Credit: Mark Alexander.

Organize a deer contest that rewards your customers’ bow-kills. The possible categories include bucks with the biggest racks, heaviest male or female deer, farthest distance traveled to participate, youngest or oldest bowhunter to harvest a deer, etc. Create weekly, monthly or season-wide contest categories, promote them, and watch hunters visit your shop to enter or track the contest’s progress. Offer prizes to winners. Prizes – and the contest itself – attract customers and encourage them to buy products or take advantage of service discounts. Also consider giving each entry or participant a range-time coupon or discounts on products and services.

5. Displays Sell More Merchandise


Don’t let business slip through your fingertips during bow season. Target bowhunters, engage new customers, and help your business flourish. It’s a great time to profit by capitalizing on the many opportunities bowhunting presents your business. Photo Credit: Shane Indrebo.

Good merchandise displays attract shoppers’ interest and sell more products. Create well-lighted displays that tell a story. Include signage, and display products so they look appealing from all angles. And, although it sounds obvious, make sure the products are relevant to your audience and the time of year.

Humayun Kahn lists several ways to improve your visual merchandising techniques in his article, “How to Create Store Designs with High-Converting Displays.” MannequinMall also offers 20 merchandising tips for retailers, including one that encourages retailers to seek visual-merchandising help from manufacturers and distributors. Those companies will likely offer suggestions because they benefit when you sell as many products as possible.

Don’t let business slip through your fingertips during bow season. Target bowhunters, engage new customers, and help your business flourish. It’s a great time to profit by capitalizing on the many opportunities bowhunting presents your business.

Share This Story