Business

9 Ways to Improve Your In-Store Marketing Techniques

Use in-store marketing techniques to increase your sales by enticing customers to buy.
Photo Credit: ATA

Author: Cassie Scott

Your savvy marketing tactics attracted more customers to your store, but they still aren’t buying enough products. How come? Perhaps your in-store marketing strategies need some work.

Whether your customers travel 5 or 25 miles to your store, make sure it’s worth their time and gas money. Use these in-store marketing tactics to entice customers to buy now, not later.

Give customers more than they expected. Be friendly, honest, personable and fun to work with. You can also dazzle customers by delegating service work to your bow technician, which frees you to offer a more sincere, personal buying experience to shoppers. Photo Credit: ATA.

Create a Welcoming Atmosphere

What happens when you walk into a store with loud, unpleasant music or an odd, obnoxious smell? Chances are you turn around and walk out, or leave sooner than you intended. Don’t let that happen to your business. Create an appealing atmosphere. Use colorful signs. Play soft background music. Light a candle, spray air freshener or set out an aromatic diffuser. Offer samples of jerky or other foods you sell. These things make customers feel welcomed, which encourages purchases.

 

Renovate, Update or Redesign

If your building looks rough around the edges, spruce it up! Paint your walls, install new floors, update your décor, or redesign your layout to give your business a fresh look. Consider your store’s layout and how customers navigate to reach items they want. Optimize their experience by making these in-store journeys simple and enjoyable. Regular customers will enjoy a change of scenery, and possibly stumble upon something they never knew you had. And while you’re at it, design your layout to prevent theft.

 

Focus on Customer Service

No matter how your customers act or feel, you must always solve problems and provide exceptional service. Give them more than they expected. Be friendly, honest, personable and fun to work with. You can also dazzle customers by delegating service work to your bow technician, which frees you to offer a more sincere, personal buying experience to shoppers. That builds customer loyalty and increases profits. Check out seven more ways to provide better customer service.

Good salespeople know their products, services and goods. They educate customers and help them find exactly what they’re seeking. Photo Credit: ATA.

Master the Art of Selling

Know the difference between being pushy and being helpful to tactfully sell products. Practice genuine kindness. Introduce yourself and offer help. Good salespeople know their products, services and goods. They educate customers and help them find exactly what they’re seeking. Identifying the right products for customers establishes trust. Once you’ve done that, ask for the sale in a way that feels comfortable. If you master the art of selling, you’ll sell more goods.

 

Stock Similar Products Together

No one wants to find field-points is Aisle 2, but then search for nocks until finding them in Aisle 10. Both are arrow components, so stock them in the same aisle. Organize your products and your store logically. Group similar products together for convenience, which also encourages customers to buy products that complement each other.

 

Use Seasonal End-Caps

Window displays attract shoppers, while in-store displays – such as end-caps – highlight products and encourage impulse sales. Your end-cap displays should spotlight new, best-selling or unique products. Staples.com says to break end-caps into three vertical sections – the banner, core and stock – to create compelling and effective displays. Update displays regularly to reflect the season or time of year.

Small $5 to $10 items placed near the register prompt sales because customers can easily add them to their carts before checking out. Photo Credit: ATA.

Encourage Add-On Buys

Racks near the checkout counter also boost profits. According to Snap Retail, 27 percent of customers make impulse buys at the register. Small $5 to $10 items placed near the register prompt sales because customers can easily add them to their carts before checking out. These items include hand tools, field-tips, fletching glue or bowstring wax.

 

Always Offer Sales

According to The Balance, small businesses have five types of customers: loyal, discount, impulse, wandering and need-based. Although loyal customers generate most of your business, ongoing sales can attract all types of customers, especially those on a budget.

Everyone likes sales. Good deals tempt people to buy because they’re saving money. Sales, discounts or clearance racks help sell excess inventory and turn products into cash. Embrace your sales rack. Move it to the front of your store so it’s the first thing customers see. Mark it with a big, red sign above your inventory so it can be seen throughout the store. Likewise, Box Fox recommends retailers make a “one-price-fits-all clearance section,” and organize inventory in $5, $10 and $20 segments to fit everyone’s budget.

 

Offer Archery Packages

Bundles and packages make buying easy. Create kits for customers of all ages, skills and budgets. Assemble kits with bows, arrows, releases and quivers. Add extra items based on the bundle you’re creating. For example, recurve archers would like an armguard and finger-tab in their bundle, and aspiring compound shooters would appreciate a release-aid. Retailers should pair each kit with a flyer that explains what’s in the package and why. The flyer also helps staff sell products confidently.

If you like these in-store ideas, update your marketing plan to include them. You’ll create a good environment for your customers and prompt them to make on-the-spot buying decisions. And while you’re at it, you can further increase sales with these merchandising tips.

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